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Governing Sustainability

Adger, Neil W, Andrew Jordan (editors). 2009. Governing Sustainability. . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Abstract

The crisis of unsustainability is, above all else, a crisis of governance. The transition to a more sustainable world will inevitably require radical changes in the actions of all governments, and it will call for significant changes to the lifestyles of individuals everywhere. Bringing together some of the world’s most highly regarded experts on governance and sustainable development, this book examines these necessary processes and consequences across a range of sectors, regions and other important areas of concern. It reveals that the governance of sustainable development is politically contested, and that it will continue to test existing governance systems to their limits. As both a state-of-the-art review of current thinking and an assessment of existing policy practices, it will be of great interest to all those who are preparing themselves – or their organisations – for the sustainability transition.

Contributors: W. Neil Adger, Andrew Jordan, Katrina Brown, Albert Weale, Philip Lowe, Katy Wilkinson, Mat Paterson, Andy Dobson, Jill Jäger, Jacquelin Burgess, Judy Clark, Andy Stirling, Ortwin Renn, Simon Dietz, Eric Neumayer, John O’Neill, Tim O’Riordan

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